pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This isn't my period of interest at all, so I'm not sure what to make of it, but doesn't it look like a Renn-Faire-esque low-cut wench bodice?

Tomb of Dame Mary Evre, 1612

Full-length photos:
http://www.davidkennardphotography.com/photos/164-Tomb-of-Dame-Mary-Evre.xhtml
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bettsy1970/4124692773/

Close-up:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfordshire_church_photos/141246914/

Found while browsing the effigy sculptures at http://plainattyre.blogspot.com.au/
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
They've redesigned their site, so I can't find what I was looking for, but I did find their collection of free-to-download PDF booklets!
http://latinst.lv/brosuras-un-bukleti/
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This is not how you do it.

Let's start with part 1 of the Norwegian clothing guide, because I have a personal interest in it.

Page 1
Norwegian Viking Clothing
http://ydalir-laget.pl/norwegia.html & plus [sic] additional photos added in by Jenny Baker

Read more... )

The majority of this stuff is copied off the internet, it's not like it would be difficult to note down the URL as you go. Or even look up sentences in google if you lost your bookmark. This sort of laziness passed off as research really pisses me off.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, online with transcriptions into Hangul and Chinese (a href="http://sillok.history.go.kr/viewer/viewtype1.jsp?id=kda_13110005_001">here's an example from the 15th century.

The Portrait of Madam Hayeon (1376~1453) can be seen and . This is a more modern re-drawing, seems to be originally from the Culture Content site.

Traditional Korean Furniture
Korean Traditional Costume and Culture, where I found...
Three images from 1420? here and here, and here.

I *think* this is a mural of a Goryeo dynasty queen in Chinese-influenced dress.

Old artwork, and modern depictions of a man and women.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
It looks like I'll be running a class on (at least one) manual alphabet(s), and I'm wondering what you would want to know.

Lots on the historical background and not so much on the actual alphabets (in which case, it'd be the forebearer of modern one-handed fingerspelling)? Or do you want a brief run down on the history, and information on lots of different alphabets (Starting with Bede's fingercounting cipher, up to the 17th century Digiti Lingua and the first two-handed manual alphabets used today in Australia & New Zealand)? Something in between? A focus on their use as mnemonics? in early education of deaf children? Their use in religious orders?

Let me know!

Woo!

Feb. 1st, 2012 10:06 am
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From the December 2011 Letter of Acceptances and Returns on heraldic stuff used in the Society for Creative Anachronism...

Ásfríðr Ulfvíðardóttir. Badge. (Fieldless) A vegetable lamb gules.

Nice badge!


Yay!

To celebrate, see some information and images of vegetable lambs [PDF]. Because the earlier paintings are damn cute.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From Peter Beatson's website:
"Costume of Byzantine Mummies of Anatolia"
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/byz_mummies/byz_mummies.htm

And from Levantia, Tim Dawson has posted links to scans of some of his articles, including the article about the Manazan tunic, which a mummy was wearing :)
http://www.levantia.com.au/clothing/clothingcontents.html
pearl: (cat)
I think they've updated their database with more photos!

See: http://unimus.no/foto/old/fixedsize.html (for small screens and netbooks, like me) or http://unimus.no/foto/

Here are the photo ID numbers for the shirt (BRM 31/2)(skjorte) from Guddal, including close-ups of the neck.
BRM_31/2 (gives you two photos of the full-length shirt)
030986 (full-length photo)
030987 (full-length photo)
030988 (full-length photo)
030989 (full-length photo)
030990 (full-length photo)
030991 (full-length photo)
030992 (full-length photo)
030996 (close-up of weave)
030995 (close up of edge)
030994 (close up of neck)
030993 (close up of neck)


For the striped tunic (kjortel) with pleated & split side-gores of awesome (BRM 31/1):
030979 (full-length photo)
030980 (full-length photo)
030981 (check out those stripes!)
031002 (it says it's of Løpegang, so I think it's focusing on the seam finishing/alteration?)
030983 (side split)
030985 (side split)
030982 (gathering at the top of the gore)
030984 (a gore)

Other:
031000 (BRM 31/3, described as a blanket or cloak here)
031001 (BRM 31/3)
031003 (BRM 31/3)
030997 (BRM 31/3)
030998 (BRM 31/3)
030999 (BRM 31/3)

031004 (31/4, a plaited band)


I'm now pretty sure that the way I interpreted Vedeler's description of the shirt collar, and her diagram, is probably what she intended (from looking at the colour photos). Not entirely sure how the collar closed though - anyone?)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
First of all, here are some extant pre-17th century paper astrolabes:

Paper Astrolabe, by Philippe Danfrie, Paris, 1584
http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/astrolabe/exhibition/34268.htm

A webpage about astronomical instruments in general, with paper examples:
http://microcosmos.uchicago.edu/ptolemy/instruments.html#paper
(Includes a cool powerpoint presentation about using the instruments in Astronomicum Caesareum, a scan is here and plates here but you can't play with it.)

But what about Chaucer? There is a series of articles online that are interesting:

Eisner, S. 1975-6 "Building Chaucer's astrolabe - I II, III" Journal of the British Astronomical Association, Vol. 86, p. 18-29, 125 - 132, 219 - 227

And here's the print-out-your-own simplified kit, including a bunch of latitudes.
Build Your Own Astrolabe
Article: http://dcford.org.uk/documents/astrolabe_jbaa.pdf
Kits: http://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/library/library_exhibitions/schoolresources/astrolabe/build
and http://www.pyxplot.org.uk/astrolabe/simplified/
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Via mittelalterforum.com:

Charlotte Rimstad. 2008. Vikinger i uld og guld. Speciale. Forhistorisk Arkæologi, Københavns Universitet.
http://www.dragt.dk/assets/PDF-filer/VikingeriUldogGuld1.pdf
It looks to be her presentation for her MA thesis

(Includes many colour photos of the textiles from the Kostrup find, and Mammen, and a bunch of other finds I've never heard of!)

Sorry, I'd write more, but there is an unconscious kitten sprawled out all over me.

Kitty!

Jan. 3rd, 2012 08:49 am
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
We have a new addition to the household. Please see Aslan's journal for the announcement, and obligatory adorable photo.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
NORAD Tracks Santa: http://www.noradsanta.org/en/index.html

For more than 50 years, NORAD and its predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD) have tracked Santa’s flight.

The tradition began in 1955 after a Colorado Springs-based Sears Roebuck & Co. advertisement for children to call Santa misprinted the telephone number. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone number put kids through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations "hotline." The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole. Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Would it be wrong to put a new (and I do mean new, not just scrounged off another machine) sewing machine motor on a 95 year old machine?
I very strongly suspect this particular Singer (same type as this one) previously had a motor added, given that it came in a 1960s case which wouldn't accommodate a handcrank. Otherwise it'll just sit there with no way to easily power itself.

Oh, and for all the people who have been asking, here is a list of (working) sewing machines I now own...
Read more... )

Sewing machines currently being cannibalised for parts include the same model of Lada, three rusty things, and the Singer Futura... turns out the motor had overheated and fused the plastic gears sitting directly above it together.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
... after an hour of solid use, it became rather hot and started to smoke. Which was interesting.

Hope nothing too important has been damaged, and I can get it going again. :)

Update: Just how flammable are sewing machines? It's been an hour and a half and it's still warm, even though it's sitting outside and still smelling horrible.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Not sure how well-known this is:

Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin
http://www.nla.gov.au/exhibitions/handwritten
Date: Saturday, 26 November, 2011 - Sunday, 18 March, 2012
Location: Exhibition Gallery, National Library of Australia

Description from their website... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I got this for $1 off ebay, straight from 1979:



Surprisingly, it works. You can press buttons and it will stitch decorative things. The instruction manual it came with included handwritten notes, so we know what to do, but the previous owner had to figure it out for herself. Apparently there is a special buttonholer attachment that determines how big the buttonhole should be from the button you insert into it, but it looks to be long gone.

I think the obvious answer is to make 16th century shirts with fake blackwork with this thing, otherwise I cannot for the life of me - other than the cool factor- figure out what I'm going to do with it.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The official English translation of "The Skjoldehamn Find in the Light of New Knowledge" is available as a downloadable .pdf at http://www.ceilingpress.com Dan Halvard Løvlid has checked it for errors and approved the translation.

The full thesis translation is finished, is being checked for errors now, and will be available soon.

Enjoy!

Gwynnyd
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I know some people out there keep an eye out for these, but there is a Singer 7-27 in Benalla up on ebay at the moment:
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Singer-7-27-sewing-machine-/290628130641?pt=AU_Sewing&hash=item43aac95751

I now am fiddling around with a Singer 99k, while waiting for ordered parts to come in, so don't need to be tempted by another machine.

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