pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Finally have my own copy of Thor Ewing's Viking Clothing, so instead of just reading bits and pieces I've sat down and read the whole thing. I must say, my first impression still stands: You need to already be familiar with what he is proposing or referring to for the book to make much sense.

But after reading it properly, there is another flaw that may be even more annoying: Not only do you have to know what he is referring to, you often have to construct his argument from what you know, rather than what he says.
I suspect this is -- despite apparently aiming the book at real-life academics who don't dress up on the weekends, given the aim of the book is to apparently spread knowledge, not dress patterns -- that a lot of his arguments are derived from his local Viking Age re-enactor/re-creation scene.


As an example, I'll focus on what I've been thinking about for a while now, the separate and possibly pleated train.
Read more... )

A minor quibble I have, too, is the lack of clear definitions. Once again, assuming the reader already knows what he is talking about.
Without defining his terms at the start, he calls the layer fastened with the tortoise brooches a 'new dress' (p. 25), 'dress' (p.26, 31, 33), 'Viking suspended dress' (p.27), 'suspended dress' (p.29), 'overdress' and 'underdress' (p. 34, both referring to Bj 563), and smokkr (p. 37).

In the middle, he randomly points out that "the so-called 'apron dress'" is only used to describe a layer where "the back and front sections are separated into two distinct pieces", which is probably describing what I'd rudely call a tea towel apron dress, but is vague enough that it could also describe the get-up described by Bau.

Which leads me to conclude that for him (and possibly his local groups), an apron-dress is something specific while there is a whole range of poorly defined garments held up with brooches. So why not select one, simple term at the start and stick to it?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
á austrvega. Saga and East Scandinavia: Preprint papers of The 14th International Saga Conference. Uppsala 9th-15th August 2009
http://hig.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:224754

Has both (huge!) volumes, but the contents page only mentions the author, not the title.

I haven't had a hard look at it, but there some are papers about(in no order) ...
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
16th century French Emblem Books at Glasgow.
Fully searchable in English, French and Latin.

PS. 16th century firefox, Devises heroïques (1551).
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Looking at book-curses again, and stumbled onto bibliophagy (book-eating) and a 17th century book that was found in a fishes' stomach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vox_Piscis
http://www.georgebayntun.com/EBC14%20Catalogue/EBC14-13.htm
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/26/books/review/26eskin.html?pagewanted=print

It's also mentioned in The Heraldry of Fish(1842) and Fishes, Flowers, & Fire (1800)
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=VC4fAAAAMAAJ
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=07ZZAAAAMAAJ

The book itself is available via EEBO if you have access.
http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/3436484
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
They seem to have added a lot of stuff since I last looked!
And if anyone can help with what the Russian(?) titles are, it would be appreciated.

This is a mixture of medieval and ethnographic-related things, but if you see an interesting link feel free to pass it on to your journal, lists etc.!
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Oh... wow...

The National Digital Library of Poland
http://www.polona.pl/dlibra/

so... many... books...
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I've been vaguely tapping out a small piece on chained books, book plates, and book inscriptions for Cockatrice, and I keep on finding two books pop up over and over.

One is Books in Chains, that is now available on the Internet Archive

The other is The Chained Library, which seems to be widely available.

Anathema! : medieval scribes and the history of book curses is at the State Library.

Now, if I can track down that book that's about renaissance bookplates it should be good.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
available at RMIT somewhere:
Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia, which has a heck of a lot on early period Latvian archaeology.

When I've finished with my hood and Manesse codex outfit, I'm going to throw myself back into Baltic, preferably a Liv outfit. With the blue spiral-decorated headband, and have a go at weaving fabric to make realistic-looking tubular selvages for the peplos gown.

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