pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Digitised and freely available online (along with notes detailing what he annotated, and where!)
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/collection/darwinlibrary

(And for the history geeks who prefer their history pre-Darwin, check out these beauties! http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/browse/year/1450-1699 )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Museum of Economic Botany in Adelaide has been refurbished! Hooray! (I was last there in 2007 for the Botanical Riches exhibitions that were all over the city. I'm an exceedingly geeky tourist.)

And off-topic question... people who have worn Birka-style apron dresses that are the open-peplos-with-straps style, how loose do you prefer them?
Read more... )

Edit: And another thought... why is it that (generally) apron dress patterns -- even the 'tea towel' sandwich board stype -- are usually reconstructed at around ankle length, but the Hedeby apron reconstructions seem to be as high as knee-length? Anyone know why!?

I'll try to remember to upload photos of my apron tonight, if anyone wants to see.
Edit, Again: Photos under the cut...
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
A review of the archaeological evidence for food plants from the British Isles: an example of the use of the Archaeobotanical Computer Database (ABCD)
Philippa Tomlinson and Allan R. Hall

The database itself seems to be at the bottom of the page.

And for name-geeks, Norwegian Farm Names from the Diplomatarium Norvegicum, as well as a generally useful searchable database of the documents.

(There is also a database of place names, with no apparent details about when they are from. Which is a shame, because there are some fantastic-sounding names in there.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm trying to put together a presentation about my project, but the catch is that I'm presenting to non-botanists, and probably non-biologists for that matter. (I know the chemistry students don't understand most of the stuff I say!)

So, can some people help out with the poll below? I'm trying to figure out at what level my introduction to plant nutrition should start at.

Read more... )
pearl: (toadstool)
B. Frank "Über die auf Wurzelsymbiose beruhende Ernährung gewisser Bäume durch unterirdische Pilze." Berichte der Deutchen Botanischen Gesellschaft, Band III, 128 - 145 (1885)
http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/fo33/frank/frank.htm

Edit:
A.P. Kelley, Mycotrophy in plants; lectures on the biology of mycorrhizae and related structures (1950)
http://www.archive.org/details/mycotrophyinplan00kell
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Herbals, their origin and evolutiion; a chapter in the history of botany, 1470-1670 (1912)
Agnes Arber
http://www.archive.org/details/herbalstheirorig00arbeuoft
Read more... )

Sundew!

Nov. 24th, 2008 07:25 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
There is a weird bubble-y looking thing growing out of the middle of my sundew. It might be that it's going to have a crack at flowering, since it looks awfully like a raceme.

So, for people who haven't met my sundew (who, except for [livejournal.com profile] teffanias' rosemary is the longest-lived plant I've owned) have some photos.
Read more... )

S/he hasn't got a name yet, any suggestions as to what I should call my Drosera sp.?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
For the hoardes of history-loving botanists out there:
A Dictionary of Old English Plant Names!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This is exciting, and really really cool.

A Biblical-aged palm seed has been successfully germinated and grown for three years, in a rather unassuming pot and is now being poked by researchers.

I gather this is a part of the Middle Eastern Medicinal Plant Project, and I hope that the figure out all the tricky bits with what gender it is, and how to get it to bear fruit.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From the OED entry on water-lilyRead more... )
I should write this up a bit more neatly, but it is interesting. :)

Lilies

Oct. 19th, 2007 04:33 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm looking at waterlilies, because I want to know if they were called lotus' or lily before 1600.

Let's start by looking at three lily/lotus flowers known in Europe:
Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., the Yellow Waterlily
Nymphaea alba L., European White Waterlily
and
Nymphaea caerulea Sav., The Egyptian Blue Lily, or Sacred Lotus.

Nuphar lutea has been found in archaeology digs, so it was definitely around.

Nymphaea alba is mentioned by Culpeper, is a native of England, it was known in medieval times and seemingly used for cures relating to sex, but by what name I don't know. Maybe nymfeta.

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