pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I had somehow completely missed this, but the Museum Gustavianum at Uppsala University has had a series of online presentations for an exhibition called Bucklor på behagen – vikingatida kvinnodräkt berättar (Buckles on Bosoms: A Viking age women’s costume speaks). It appears the exhibition curator was Annika Larsson, though it appears other researchers were involved.


(The URL doesn't seem to be working right this moment, is it working for anyone else?)


In any case, it seems to give us a better idea of how she came to her conclusions regarding the open fronted dress interpretation she is now infamous for.


Part 1: Vikingatida kvinnodräkt berättar/ A Viking age women’s costume speaks [PDF]

Part 2: Siden från andra sidan jorden/ Silks from across the globe [PDF]

Part 3: Välkommen på maskerad: Klänning med släp. / Welcome to the Masquerade: Dress with Train. [PDF]

Part 4: Bland ben och bestar / Among bones and beasts [PDF]

Part 5: Var vikingarna blonda och blåögda?/ Were the Vikings blond and blue-eyed? [PDF]

Part 6: Speglar gravarnas dräkter verkligen den vikingatida kvinnans vardag? För bättre förståelse görs jämförelser med mansgravar./ Are the burial costumes really a reflection of the Viking Age woman’s everyday life? Comparisons are made with male graves to reach a better understanding. [PDF]


If I am following the arguments being made (albeit in a minimalist-text slideshow), then her argument is that the paired oval brooches are only found in the wealthiest graves (part 1 p. 9)

Part 3 is probably the most pertinent, though, as it spells things out clearly:

"Our hypothesis is that the clothing found in Viking Age female graves was a ceremonial dress. There are no
archaeological finds to support the theory that the dress represented moderate everyday clothing.... Recently, an archaeological find of a Viking Age female outfit was discovered in Western Russia. The outfit
consisted of an outer dress made of patterned silk in red and blue. To the outer dress belonged oval brooches, typical for the Vikings. Close to the body was a shift made of blue linen cloth. The shift had an
opening on the chest and was tied at the neck with a ribbon. The shift gathered at the neck-line. In the Birka female graves, blue linen cloth has also been found. There were lined cuffs found with the dress,
made from silk with a red bottom layer, and decorative ribbons cut from patterned silk. The outer dress was also embellished with exquisite lace from gold or silver thread."


Page 4 of the PDF is a stunning, and clear, illustration showing just how the Pskov "sarafan" was interpreted, with the taller panel pleated, and draped at the back.


Part 6 is also useful for illuminating how the open, trained garment is interpreted from "valkyrie" images, as unlike Bau's older interpretation the decoration at the front of the figures is not seen as evidence for a front panel, but is the gown worn underneath. Describing the Hårby valkyrie (mis-IDed as coming from Tissø) as:

"Several Viking Age depictions show weapon-carrying persons clothed in female burial costumes. The upper dress is open at the front and consists of a silk material with a bold pattern. A pleated shift can be glimpsed. This “female figure” carries a sword and a shield."

and

"The burial costumes of the boatgraves were part of the pre-Christian norms.

Our own time’s concept of dress conventions are built on Christian beliefs and cannot be used for interpretation. Christian law forbade the use of skirts for men. Women were not allowed to wear trousers."



There is also an interesting tidbit hidden in part 1, page 16-17. Boat grave 36 at Gamla Uppsala may have been cast as two shells, then riveted together, which isn't too unusual, but there may be decorative fabric between the two shells, possibly as a contrasting colour to metal.



Part 3 has a lot to chew over, the problem is that it is easy to think of rebuttals to the arguments presented, but because the PDFs are so sparse of information, it's hard to know why those conclusions are being drawn.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Daugavas lībiešu 10.-13. gadsimta krūšu važiņrotas ar bruņrupuču saktām.
(10th-13th Century Daugava Liv Pectoral Chain Ornaments with Tortoise Brooches.)
by Roberts Spirģis, 2006.
https://dspace.lu.lv/dspace/handle/7/276

It's a PhD thesis, and is very information-dense, but is also very, *very* cool.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I know someone, somewhere was looking for instructions, so I hope that someone is you!

Viking Brooches Using Sculpey III Clay, Part 1 and Part 2 by Caitlin ni Dhubhghaill
Downloadable as PDFs from:
https://sites.google.com/site/trimarispeers/laurels/caitlin-ni-dhubhghaill
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I think I want to make a field guide to brooch-spotting... so things you can wear instead of 'typical' oval brooches, and things that look like Norse Viking Age brooches that aren't. So I'm just going to put these links here for now:

Read more... )

Anything I've missed?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Just curious to know, who or which company is your favourite supplier of bossed, oval-shaped metal bling?

And as a follow-on question, anyone seen any of Northstar Armoury's brooches in person? They look lightweight (which is a good thing, for me) but they also don't seem to answer e-mails. :(

Edit: Oooh, just remembered: Mercia Sveiter list the weights of their jewellery, along with photographing them on a grid for scale.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From the Nov/Dec issue of British Archaeology, an article by Jane Kershaw about female Viking Age jewellery in the Danelaw, and how Anglo Saxon and Scandinavian jewellery differed (including differences in the pin fitting! How cool is that!?).

I can't get the site to load directly, so here is the google cache version of the article, although the original page should be here.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] aslan42's family has the tradition of having one big Kris Kringle gift, so other than a graduation marsupial, I got from Quiet Press some Baltic-style tortoise brooches.

I plan to pull out my book on the Salaspils Laukskola finds, as well as the other stuff I can find on Liv brooches, (I'm pretty sure Rituals and Relations has a picture of the same find.)

And all of the information I've been collecting about the 'Gotlandic-style' [PDF] bead spreaders can be put to good use.

Photos!

Jul. 29th, 2008 03:53 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I promised another photo of me wearing my outfit from Midwinter, so here it is:
A generic, early 14th century outfit. )

I also promised more Livonian stuff:
The improved tool brooch, with extra tool. )

A Hint on the next jewellery project )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Cool things from the Historiska Museet.
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Sort-of random, pretty things from the Historiska Museet.
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This all ties in with the posts on brooches in Lithuania, I promise.

Kopfbedeckungen  für Frauen im Deutschland des 13. Jahrhunderts had a picture of a 'hair sack' from Naumburg cathedral, as does bildindex, who is from the slave girl from Peter's Renunciation (From the Web Gallery of Art) Check out the relatively good picture of her entire outfit. Hooray!

But even the girl has an annular brooch holding her cloak in place, as do the more famous sculptures of the Queens Uta, Reglindis and the others nobody seems to pay much attention to. (But they show quite clearly the collar of Uta can stand up or lie flat.)

With the hair sack, there is an attempted reconstruction here. This version just treats it as another way to wrap a veil.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Formatting issues... so no special characters today. Sorry.

I was actually looking up articles for revision, when I came across some random articles that are interesting:
S. Sajauskas. "Pirmu,ju, Lietuvos Didziosios Kunigaikstystes moneto ypatybes" (Peculiarities of the First Coins of the Duchy of Lithuania)
Pinigu studijos (2) 2004
http://www.lbank.lt/lt/leidiniai/pinigu_studijos2004_2/sajauskas.pdf

More coin-related articles!
(The word pinigeliai means silver coins, so I'm guessing it's related to the journal title.

Eugenijus Svetikas "6-pointed star brooches in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and their analogies in the Holy Roman Empire" Lituanistica, 2003, nr. 3. PDF

Eugenijus Svetikas "Star of Bethlehem Pins in the GDL and Livonia: Insignia or Sign of Devotion"
Lietuvos Istorijos Metrastis (1) 2002 [English Summary only]

Eugenijus Svetikas "Traces of the Benedictine Order activities in Old Trakai during the Christianization of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the 15th – early 16th century: an attribute of the cult of St. Catherine of Alexandria – brooches containing the symbol of wheel."
Lituanistica 3(71) 2007 [link to PDF]
Has colour photos, and a bears claw pendant and a button. Wow!

Eugenijus Svetikas "The Influence of Livonia on the Christiaization of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania: Crucifixes in late 14th-15th c. Lithuanian graves" Lituanistica (1) 2007 [PDF]

Eugenijus Svetikas Alytaus kapinynas: christianizacijos šaltiniai (Vilnius: Diemedžio leidykla, 2003) [English summary only]

Judging by a post on the SIG list, he has written more articles, but the journal issues of Lituanistica aren't online, and only available if I go to Canberra.

A very cool list of researchers, and their specialties

One last thing; Olaf Groubitz's Purses in Pieces has a PDF preview of the book at oxbowbooks.com Go check it out and drool all over your monitor.

Edit: Women in 16th century Lithuania. I know I've posted links to articles about it before, but I don't think this article was included.

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