pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
A very sneaky person let me look at her books, and I think I like 15-16th century German stuff (at least, I think that's the sort of thing this lady in the Behem codex is wearing. (More scans here).

I'll ask a very big favour of my readers: I don't really want to be spoon-fed all the answers on how to make a dress like that, but I would like to know if it is similar to any other, more commonly re-created styles, and (because I have a poor sense of fashion) if those fantastic fur capelet/goller things could be worn with this sort of style? Hopefully if someone is kind enough to point me in the right direction, I can figure it out from there?

I've been like this all weekend... I know I'm over-excited and inarticulate like nobody's business. So let me know if I'm making no sense at all!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Kaiserin Agnes von Poitou
Schmuck u. Kopfbedeckungen fuer Frauen, and the book they reference.

I was looking at 7th century Frankish stuff too, and found some book references, that I'm sticking here rather than forgetting where they are in my bookmarks.
http://nla.gov.au/anbd.bib-an2178914
http://nla.gov.au/anbd.bib-an1399248
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Oh god, YouTube has everything.

It has music clips of Die Prinzen and Erste Allgemeine Verunsicherung.

The latter were responsible for my Austrian accent (when speaking German) during my last two years of high school. And... I'd never seen their video clips... my god the eyeliner and hair. But I still know all the words.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Saule Urbanviciene "Survivals of Paganism in 14th-17th century Graves in Lithuania" in Michael Müller-Wille [ed] Rom und Byzanz im Norden: Mission und Glaubenswechsel im Ostseeraum während des 8.-14. Jährhunderts (Franz Steiner Verlag, 1997)
http://snipurl.com/2e2o0 or long google url )

is really, really exciting. If only because most of the references in her bibliography I've seen, and she once again mentions Heldt's costume book of mysteriousness.

So, here's what I've found when it comes to the Heldt'schen Trachtenbuch:

It's referenced here, here, here, here[PDF] and here, and while everyone can agree on the author and date, nobody can agree on what the book is called.

It is in the Lipperheidische Kostümbibliothek, of the Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Berlin. I'm having trouble finding any actual reference to anything by a 16th century Heldt in their catalogue, so I may just have to write to them.

Edit: Found this reference, to:
Ulinka Rublack "Clothing and cultural exchange in Renaissance Germany"
In: Robert Muchembled [ed] Cultural exchange in early modern Europe. Vol 4
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006 - 2007) – ISBN 0-521-85553-5. pp. 258-288

The whole series looks really interesting though, I'll have to ILL the books. It's all a bit expensive to buy
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This all ties in with the posts on brooches in Lithuania, I promise.

Kopfbedeckungen  für Frauen im Deutschland des 13. Jahrhunderts had a picture of a 'hair sack' from Naumburg cathedral, as does bildindex, who is from the slave girl from Peter's Renunciation (From the Web Gallery of Art) Check out the relatively good picture of her entire outfit. Hooray!

But even the girl has an annular brooch holding her cloak in place, as do the more famous sculptures of the Queens Uta, Reglindis and the others nobody seems to pay much attention to. (But they show quite clearly the collar of Uta can stand up or lie flat.)

With the hair sack, there is an attempted reconstruction here. This version just treats it as another way to wrap a veil.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
13th century pleated hats and bands (so, we're not quite into pleated veils yet...)

Kopfbedeckungen für Frauen im Deutschland des 13. Jahrhunderts
by Nicole Perschau

Krusekanter i 1200-tallets kvindehovedtøjer
by Camilla Luise Dahl
My own quick and nasty translation about the Spanish pleated stuff.

I prefer the style with barbette, fillet and veil, not entirely sure why. I think it's because headwear is one of the things a lot of people think about the least (and wear the least) so going completely overboard by wrapping myself up in linen might be over-compensating.

I also want to stick to more German sources, since I plan to move into Polish fashion next, and as far as I can tell they are very similar styles. Anyone with better knowledge of 13th century Polish fashion, please correct me!

Update

May. 3rd, 2007 01:19 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
There are now pictures of the Freydal mummers.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
It's one of those annoying words in German -- from the context I'm assuming it's a type of tunic, but nobody in the backpacker hostel knew what the word was, and they were German.


Note: Most of the links are going to be in German, so people are going to get really bored.
Read more... )

Profile

pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
pearl

January 2015

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
1112 1314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 04:41 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios