pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Icelandic Web of Science: Hvenær lærðu Íslendingar að prjóna og af hverjum? (When did Icelanders learn to knit, and by whom?)

It has photos of (I think?) 16th century mitten, but it also mentions 17-18th c. children's socks, and a ca. 1600 mitten from Bergþórshvol.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
First up, a photo I would love to know more about. Do any knitters or Tudor-clothing fans recognise it?
http://flickr.com/photos/romanyway_designs/216892017/in/set-72157594230443709/
Edit: Thanks [livejournal.com profile] mmcnealy and [livejournal.com profile] jillwheezul.
If you go to http://www.museumoflondonprints.com/ and search for 'knitted' you get nice photos, and some other knitted things.

Second, das Bußgewand der heiligen Elisabeth [the penance-garment of St. Elisabeth]
http://www.spurensuche-elisabeth-limburg.de/bussgewand.html
Photos: http://www.spurensuche-elisabeth-limburg.de/bilderoberwalluf.pdf
and http://www.spurensuche-elisabeth-limburg.de/bussgewandkorr.jpg
I found out about it through the Surviving Garments Database, looking through the publication list. It's 'Garment No.: 648' and is dated to the 13th century.

Knitting

Jul. 13th, 2008 02:14 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Whoah! I just casted on... sort of... Thank-you YouTube! (My 70s craft books helped too.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From the reference mentioned in a Turnau article. Turnau mentioned a knitted Latvian shawl, which isn't mentioned in the English summary, but it might be in the Polish part. (Especially considering the article is focusing on Lithuania.)

Jaworski, Zygmunt (1949) "Welny tkanin ze sredniowiecznych kurkahow L.S.R.R."/"The wool of the Early Historical Tissues, found in the mount-tombs of Lithuanian S.S.R. Slavia Antiqua 486-507

p.506 [English summary]
"Woolen tissues with a linen ,,braid" were made and also tissues made by the system of four thread holders [ie. tablet weaving?]. Knitted goods were made with the aid of knitting needles of metal or wood. In these goods bronze beads about 6-7mm long and about 5mm in diameter were sometimes knitted in about every 20mm from each other, for decorative purposes. The remnants found in tombs prove that haberdashery ornaments were also made, very modest and simple however."
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From: Irena Turnau, 1973 "Aspects of the Russian Artisan: The Knitter of the Seventeenth to the Eighteenth Century." Textile History (4) p. 7

The first traces of knitted goods, which have been found within the territory of the present Soviet Union, date from the early Middle Ages. Archaeological excavations have produced implements used in knitting and also the remains of garments. A type of shawl was brought to light in the Latvian excavations. (1) The indoor slippers from Belozero, dating from the eleventh-twelfth century, were crocheted or possibly knitted. (2)

There's also mention of a naalbinded glove from the 16th century from Fadeev, and the Gdansk glove.

(1) Z. Jaworski, 'Welny tkanin ze sredniowiecznych kurkahow L.S.R.R.' Slavia Antiqua II, I, 1949-50
Edit: A Lithuanian Bibliography says the reference is...
Zygmunt Jaworski 'Welny tkanin z wozesnoshistorycznych kurhanow L.S.R.R.' Slavia Antiqua (2) 1949-50 pp.[486]-507

(2) L.I. Jakunina, 'Fragmenty odezdy i obuvi' Istoriceskij pamjatnik russkogo Artikticeskogo moreplavanija XVII veka (Leningrad: 1951) pp.179-186

Now I want to know about the shawl, since I know some Viking re-enactor types have been naalbinding shawls, and sadly Turnau's work is often translated weirdly so there's little difference between knitting and naalbinding. Crocheting usually just means naalbinding though.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Museum of London PDF press pack of the exhibition. (The front cover with the poulaines and modern shoes is worth it. Actually the entire file is really cool. Includes x-rays of medieval loaded dice, and photos medieval knitting. Mmmmm.)

A HTML article about the whip

For those who want to see more whips, I found an undated one from the Mittelalterliches Foltermuseum, Freiburg. (Medieval torture museum)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I can feel a Cockatrice article coming on, after exams and essays though.

Another Link - http://www.liis.lv/cimdi/ (Pirkstaiņi has patterns)

Some of the 'knitted' fragments from Riga may have been naalbinded (although I can't be sure until articles I've requested from the National Library have appeared.) They might be different mittens again. Both the sort with fingers (ie. gloves) and mittens.
I have also found a citation for knitted caps with ear flaps in Latvia.

[livejournal.com profile] hometime, do you have a copy of "Folk Knitting in Estonia"? There is apparantly some sort of historical background mentioned in it, but how far back it goes in history isn't said. Any idea if it's worth chasing it down at a library?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Hey, I recognise these knitting diagrams!
The first image in the top row is a reconstructed mitten from a 15th century find in Riga.
And I know enough Latvian to know the title says 'mitten/gloves patterns'.

From the Latvian postal service-- stamps!
2005 envelope design of mittens, 2004, 2003, 2002.

The 2005 stamp, 2004, 2003.

The website that provided a lot of this wonderful linkage.

Profile

pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
pearl

January 2015

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
1112 1314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 24th, 2017 03:54 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios