pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
If you have come looking for information on medieval Korea, be sure to visit my website where things are hopefully grouped together coherently.

http://www.medieval-baltic.us/korea.html

If you're looking for information about medieval sign lexicons, and language, see:
http://medieval-baltic.us/msl.html
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Apparently people don't like looking at preserved corpses. So, don't click on these links.

I've been looking at more photos of the mummy from Osan, Korea, that is said to be from the 16th century.

English summary: http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/05/14/2010051401110.html

Here are photos (navigate with the arrows) of various stages of unpacking her coffin. I'm now very interested in the back of her head, and if the first image the page loads on (http://photo.donga.com/view.php?idxno=201005130005) is a small veil (garima?) in the upper right hand side of the photo.

And she had a teeeny tiny pouch! http://media.paran.com/news/view.kth?dirnews=1476100&year=2010&rtlog=MP&p_eye=medi^con^b01^medi^click

Edit: and she is wearing a sock! http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=beryu1&logNo=110086185721&viewDate=¤tPage=1&listtype=0
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, online with transcriptions into Hangul and Chinese (a href="http://sillok.history.go.kr/viewer/viewtype1.jsp?id=kda_13110005_001">here's an example from the 15th century.

The Portrait of Madam Hayeon (1376~1453) can be seen and . This is a more modern re-drawing, seems to be originally from the Culture Content site.

Traditional Korean Furniture
Korean Traditional Costume and Culture, where I found...
Three images from 1420? here and here, and here.

I *think* this is a mural of a Goryeo dynasty queen in Chinese-influenced dress.

Old artwork, and modern depictions of a man and women.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Cross-posting from the SCA-Korea list:

Last year, two 16th century female mummies were found, preserved along with some of their clothing and accessories. The news stories are a little out of order, because they found the earlier-dated mummy first, but it is believed that these women were the first and second wife of a government official.

The earlier mummy may have been in her late teens to early 20s, and part of that judgement was based on the bright red and green clothes she had been wearing. There is also the suggestion that she was pregnant when she died.
Links to news articles )

The second wife made it into some Western news articles because she was buried with a 'handbag', and I'd love to know if those metallic-looking circles are some sort of shisha-like work. She was buried later than the first wife
Links to news articles )

And an article about the two mummies being studied together:
Researchers conduct examination of 2 female mummies
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Korean food is full of chili and spice, and cook books often put the introduction of chili at the end of the 16th century -- either when Europeans showed up, or the Japanese tried to kill them with it. I've never really believed either story, mostly because the Jesuits by all accounts were more interested in ministering to Japanese troops, and because you didn't want to kill all of the Koreans since you could sell/use them as slaves and craftspeople (and, if you were so inclined, convert the Koreans in Japan to Christianity).

So, after stumbling onto the rather useful List of Sources of Korean Culinary History (I'd only known about the Dasik in Domundaejak from ca. 1611), I noticed Wikipedia was claiming that the first mention of chili peppers was in the 1613/4 Jibongyuseol. It seems, if the little article from JoongAng Daily (and Chosun Ilbo and this preview from Yonhap) is to be believed, that it's even more complex than that:

Read more... )

Shame I can't find any mention of anything published about this.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I know I'm mostly talking to myself when it comes to Korean things, so talking about skirts is behind the cut... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
万国人物図/ People of the World(?)
Published 1645 in Nagasaki. Online at the Digital Archives of the Kyushu University Museum.
http://record.museum.kyushu-u.ac.jp/bankoku/
Top row, third from the left are Koreans, it also seems there are Portuguese, Dutch, Germans, and other interesting woodcuts, too.

There is also the 世界人物図巻/ A Number of People of the World(?), from 1714(?).
http://record.museum.kyushu-u.ac.jp/sekaijinbutsu/
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
For some weird reason, I started looking for information about the arrow-tossing game today.

Joseon dynasty jar:
http://www.dosanseowon.com/coding/sub5/sub1_1.asp?seq=442

Japanese toko set:
http://sites.asiasociety.org/arts/asiangames/power01.html

Chinese vases in the shape of a touhu pot:
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=5bBhgKbJHzsC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=touhu+arrow+game&source=bl&ots=KUyO9sS5h1&sig=EugXeVO7wojGMOr_T5LntoxYErI&hl=en&ei=6JsoS-SWGs-GkAW3yZnyDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CA0Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=touhu%20arrow%20game&f=false
The Classic of Rites mentions Touhu.

Touhu pot and players from the Hong Kong heritage museum:
http://www.heritagemuseum.gov.hk/english/exhibition_highlight_file/exhibition_sel_past_result.asp?exid=86

A Ming dynasty touhu: http://www.ejfrankel.com/details.asp?artID=453
and a gorgeous exhibit about games in general: http://www.ejfrankel.com/exhibition.asp?exhibID=91

and I should try to find a copy of:
Isabelle Lee "Touhu: Three Millennia of the Chinese Arrow Vase and the Game of the Pitch-Pot," Transactions of the Oriental Ceramic Society 56 (1991-2): 13-27
and
Richard C. Rudolf "The Antiquity of T'ou Hu" Antiquity 24 (1950) 175-8

Korea's Pasttimes and Customs has a lot of literary evidence, too.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Via [personal profile] florentinescot, via SCAToday, via the Joong Ang Ilbo:


The National Museum of Korea has an exhibition on called The Crossroads of Civilizations: Ancient Culture of Uzbekistan.
The thing that seems to be causing all the excitement is that there is a reproduction of (at least one of) the 7th c. murals from Afrasiab Palace, Samarkand, that has been interpreted as including two Korean ambassadors.

What caught my eye, was this from the Joong Ang Ilbo piece:
The actual nationality of the two men in the painting was long debated by specialists, with some saying that their clothing shows they are from the Silla (57 B.C.-935) or Balhae (698-926) eras. With the revelation of the jougwan, however, many have concluded that the men are from the Goguryeo era.

A bit of background -- this is the Three Kingdoms period, so your three choices in the seventh century are Goguryeo, Silla or Baekje. And it seems all three varieties of kingdom official wore jougwan (조우관), although the main debate seems to have been between Goguryeo and Baekje.* (Just to confuse, what came after Goguryeo was Balhae, where they continued wearing jougwan.)

The only argument I can find that firmly describes the ambassadors as Goguryeo comes from this article (will open a pop up window, and you need to go to page 97), which implies it isn't so much the jougwan that is the deciding factor, but the diplomatic clout of Goguryeo.

If you want to see a line drawing of the reconstruction, this article [PDF] on page 33 will help.

*For example, this article from the Journal of the Korean Society of Clothing Industry or here says Baekje officials wore jougwan.

And so I don't get confused, again, this is the Korean Society of Clothing Industry. This is the Korean Society for Clothing and Textiles. They have all of their English pages here, and you can access their Korean journals for free here.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
No photos, just a frustratingly brief article in English:
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/art/2009/11/148_56001.html

Korean-language news comes with photos though:
http://news.hankooki.com/lpage/culture/200911/h2009112322185086330.htm

Looks like the jeogori (jacket) is 17th century, I think it also says there are the female clothes, too.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
http://www.romanization.org/main.php

(McCune-Reischauer is one of the commonly used Romanisation systems for Korean. The other main contender is Revised Romanization.)

And there has also been a fair bit of media on the Cia-Cia language adopting Hangul as its' official script.
(It seems to be strongly implied by a few bloggers, although not outright stated, that the language is endangered because it hasn't been legitimized with a written form. The Hunminjeongeum Research Institute says the script was required as there was "a lack of tool to hand it down to its descendants."
http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_international/369998.html
The comments on Language Log are interesting, too: http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=1641
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
No photos, but expect them soon!

hanbok update )
I'm not 100% happy with how this outfit has turned out, but that's one of the pleasures of making historic outfits-- you always learn something new. I just occasionally wish I wasn't so fascinated in things very few people seem interested in, because then I'd have more people to exchange ideas with. :)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The list of pre-17th century Korean clothing has been updated, hopefully with more stable links (although I doubt it), and more links to things like sandals, and different types of male clothing.
pearl: (hanbok)
The Met's Art of the Korean Renaissance, 1400-1600 exhibition is ending in a few days, (but the exhibition catalogue/book is said to be very very shiny and cool), but the website still has some exciting bits and bobs.

Like... Gisaeng!
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/KoreanRenaissance/literati_essentials.aspx?id=09

And other women!
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/KoreanRenaissance/worship_paradise.aspx?id=33

Hooray!
pearl: (hanbok)
Eung-Tae Lee, was a Joseon male who died in the 1580s.

I've been going mad trying to find *any* information about shoes, and was finding vague references that he was buried with shoes. As I kept digging (and discovering an Antiquity article I need to wait a few more months to access) I found out some more stuff.

Namely, his shoes were sandals, and were part of a folk remedy at the time as they were woven from a mixture of hemp and his wifes' hair! She also wrote a letter to him, mourning his death (and it looks like it is written in hangul.)
http://bugo10.com/bbs/viewbody.html?code=board5&page=9&id=10032&number=10032&keyfield=&key=
http://www.withoutwax.org/Without_Wax/Blog/Entries/2008/11/14_16th_Century_Love_Letters.html


Edit: Beautiful, very high-quality looking photos of the letters and a shoe in Korea Magazine (8)5 2009 pp.35-39 (The linked page links to a very very large PDF file. 8.3Mb)
And a folding fan! Woo! (I read *somewhere* that folding fans were male-specific, but it is still cool.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
For [personal profile] hometime: This book is at the NLA. Korean Jeogori, 2000 years. It appears to have some linedrawings and photos from it used here.

Secondly, there is an SCA-Korea yahoo group (I didn't do it). And they seem to be both in need of members, and knowledge. Go visit them if you're interested in pre-17th century stuff.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
It's a website all about historic Korean hairstyles. highlights ) And from browsing through the National Museum of Korea site, if you search for 'palm,' you'll get what I think they're saying is a 'signature,' and if you search for 'tea' you get a Muromachi-era Japanese tea set. =)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Here's what I've found so far...
Read more... )

Another link, showing a reconstructed 16th century outfit: http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2006/05/29/2006052961020.html
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I've mentioned the painting of what seems to be court dancers before, but here it is again.
Ignoring the brightly coloured girls (as much as I want that overcoat), check out the girls in the lower left-hand corner.

If wikipedia is right, the headwear of an uinyeo/medicine woman, is a garima, which transliterating into hangul gives me these two pictures of a stiff veil-thing.
Could that be what the solid blue-ish thing on the back of their head is? Trying to show a veil that apparently is usually depicted as black, against black hair?

It is a longshot, since most 'traditional' elements of hanbok usually are 18th century, but it's interesting.
Mind you, wikipedia also says gisaeng wore po on their heads, wouldn't that mean a jangot/(장옷)?

In a sort-of related link: 16th century mummy and her reconstructed clothes!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Anonymous 1585 painting, the title has something to do with King Seonjo.
http://www.women.or.kr/ehtml/herstory/echosun/eunknw8h.html

Mid 16th century painting of a Buddhist temple.
http://www.women.or.kr/ehtml/herstory/echosun/eunknw36h.html

Undated, anonymous painting
http://www.women.or.kr/herstory/WomenArt/chosun/unknw29h.html

I'd write more, but I've had a persistent headache all day. Blergh.

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