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If you have come looking for information on medieval Korea, be sure to visit my website where things are hopefully grouped together coherently.

http://www.medieval-baltic.us/korea.html

If you're looking for information about medieval sign lexicons, and language, see:
http://medieval-baltic.us/msl.html
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In one of those moments of "why didn't I notice this before," here is an extract from:
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. 1717. "Signa Secundum Ordinem Cisterciensem" In: Collectanea etymologica (Hanover); pp. 384–408

According to page 70 of Wilhelm Wundt's The Language of Gesture, (Walter de Gruyter):

"Leibniz left us two volumes cataloguing the Cistercian gestures: a Latin one with no indication of its origin, and a Low German one from the former monastery of Lockum (Loccum, in Lower Saxony, founded in 1163). The Latin register counts 143 examples, the Lockum one 145 examples of gestures."

I've never tried to translate Low German before, so we'll see how I go... I think the answer is 'not very well' - if anyone can suggest resources I could refer to, it'd be appreciated!

Updated, now with extra [personal profile] catsidhe-added goodness!
Signs no. 1-26 )

The only hint I've found for Dünningen comes from the 1650 Lettisches und Teutsches Wörterbuch, which has die Schläffe, dünningen., which may be schlaff of saggy, loose, limp, flaccid... or die Schläfen, the temples (on the head). I think it's temple.
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The Virtual Museum of Canada [ote: automatically starting sound]n has an online exhibition, including videos of Trappist monks from Nôtre-Dame des Prairies showing some signs.

The only sign list I have seen for Trappist MSL is very loosely dated between the 12-17th centuries, which I've previously mentioned on this journal, when trying to translate it. But, I thought it would be fun to compare the two sources, just to see how things change over time. :)

Read more... )
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The Last 44 signs...

Hope the formatting works better than last time... Anyone know if vitres has another meaning that doesn't relate to glass or glazing?
Read more... )
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p.252-255

Highlight is probably the sighting of ASL CHEESE. (Note: I only know one sign in ASL, and any sensible article will remind you that it's a miming action and probably arose independently a number of times. But it still makes me smile.) There is also time-keeping which I don't think I've ever seen mentioned before, but these are 17th century Trappists we're discussing-- there's a reason they're known as the Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae and have the most rumours about taking a Vow of Silence.

Read more... )
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Part 1 and Part II, if you missed them.

pp.250-251.

Does the word fesant under Demander à prêter mean anything to anyone?
Read more... )
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From: Louis Du Bois. 1824. Histoire civile, religieuse et littéraire de l'abbaye de La Trappe.

Cleaned up OCRed text on the left, machine translation with a bit of online dictionary, for suspect words, on the right.

If someone could have a look at Assiette, Beaucoup, it would be appreciated.

So far, up to p. 250.
Read more... )

C'est ainsi qu'avec 167 mots, rendus par un petit nombre de signes, la plupart ingénieux, simples et clairs, les Trappistes exprimaient leurs idées principales, satisfesaient, sans violer le silence, aux principaux besoins qu'ils éprouvaient, et communiquaient leur pensée avec facilité et promptitude.

Thus, with 167 words provided by a small number of signs, most ingenious, simple and clear, the main ideas expressed Trappists, satisfactorily without violating the silence, the main needs they experienced and they communicated their thoughts with ease and promptness.
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Just noticed this postgrad student session -- sounds interesting, wish I was in the right hemisphere for it. :)

Christine Wallis: Monasteriales Indicia and the Syon Nunnery sign list: Two Medieval Monastic Sign Language Lists Compared

There's an abstract here [PDF], since I'm not sure how long that description will stay there, I've copied it here. )

Fingers crossed something gets published out of this! I think it's awesome someone is seriously looking at the Syon list.
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Following a footnote on p. 170 of Silence and Sign Language in Medieval Monasticism: The Cluniac Tradition c.900-1200, there is a sign-list that (so the machine translated text says) is 'a vocabulary of signs carried through the Cistercian Order from the beginning of its' establishment and renewed by de Rancé during the Trappist reform.'

According to Wikipedia, Armand Jean le Bouthillier de Rancé joined La Trappe Abbey in the 1660s, so at the latest it's apparently a 17th century French list.

The book is: Louis Du Bois. 1824. Histoire civile, religieuse et littéraire de l'abbaye de La Trappe., it's available to download on GoogleBooks and the sign list is pages 248-258. I don't know French, so I have no idea if the text has been 'modernised' (to 19th century French) or not.

MSL

Feb. 22nd, 2009 09:10 am
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Don't think I've linked to these before...

Bragg, Louis "Visual-Kinetic Communication in Europe Before 1600: A Survey of Sign Lexicons and Finger Alphabets Prior to the Rise of Deaf Education" Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education (2)1, 1997 1-25
http://jdsde.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/2/1/1.pdf [PDF]

Conde-Silvestre, Juan C. "The Code and Context of Monasteriales Indicia: A Semiotic Analysis of Late Anglo-Saxon Monastic Sign Language" Studia Anglia Posnaniensia (36) 2001 145-169
http://ifa.amu.edu.pl/sap/files/36/11condesilvestre.pdf [PDF]

Schmitt, Jean-Claude "The rationale of gestures in the West: third to thirteenth centuries" in Jan Bremmer and Herman Roodenburg [eds.] A Cultural History of Gesture (Cornell University Press, 1992) 59-70
http://keur.eldoc.ub.rug.nl/FILES/wetenschappers/11/125/03_c3.pdf [PDF]
The contents page is pretty sexy too [PDF] might track down a paper copy if I can.
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Started to put up things about medieval sign languages and lexicons.
http://medieval-baltic.us/msl.html

The List of Sign Lists is barely started, and already looks too squished and full. Anyone have a better suggestion to lay all this stuff out? (Keeping in mind that it's largely 'title-explanation-links offsite'.)

To do: I need to figure out a nice way of explaining the difference between a language and a lexicon, without the average lay persons' head exploding. I could put something up about medieval medicine and hearing aids too, but probably not today.
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In "Horrible Histories: The Stormin' Normans" by Terry Deary (thanks [livejournal.com profile] laurenmitchell!) there is a bit about sign language and monks.

p.115

St. Bernard of Clairvaux* was horrified by what he saw at Canterbury...

As to the dishes and number of them -- what shall I say?
I have often heard sixteen or more costly dishes were placed on the table. Many kinds of fish (roast and boiled, stuffed and fried) many dishes created with eggs and pepper by skillful cooks and so on! The meal was washed down with wine, claret, mead and all drinks that can make a man drunk. The rule of silence did not prevent monks from showing their pleasure with signs that made them look more like jesters or clowns than monks. They were all waving with fingers, hands and arms and whistling to one another instead of speaking.


*Later on, St. Bernard is described as being such a devout monk that he gave all of his possessions away, including 'his name to a dog'. Great joke, but it's not true! The dog is named after St. Bernard of Menthon. :)
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Juan C. Conde-Silvestre, (2001) The code and context of Monasteriales Indicia: a semiotic analysis of late Anglo-Saxon monastic sign language Studia Anglica Posnaniensia 36 pp. 145-169
Naturally I find the free online version after tracking down the physical journal.

David Sherlock (1989) "Anglo-Saxon monastic sign language at Christchuch, Canterbury", Archaeologia Cantiana 107: 1-27.
I'll be visiting at the state library next week! So exciting!

P Ekman (1969) "The repertoire of non-verbal communication: Categories, origins, usage and coding", Semiotica 1: 49-98.
Is at my uni library, so I'll look at it later this week.

Oh, and can anyone explain why my bone belt buckle made it through quarantine without any comment, but my sewing shears were inspected? I would have thought it the other way around.
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There are now two English translations of the Signa Loquendi, translated from Walter Jarecki's Latin transcription. (Which I can't afford, and doesn't seem to be available in the country.)

The first is just the foods, in
Kirk Ambrose (2006) "A Medieval Food List from the Monastery of Cluny" Gastronomica 6 14–20 Abstract here

The second is the entire list, in Scott G. Bruce (2007) Silence and Sign Language in Medieval Monasticism (Cambridge: CUP)

It also appears in his Doctoral Thesis
Scott Gordon Bruce, (2000). Uttering no human sound: Silence and sign language in western medieval monasticism. (Ann Arbor, Mich. : U.M.I. 2000)

along with his own translations of the Fleury, Canterbury and Hirsau lists, which don't appear to have made it into his book.

There is an Italian translation as well, in
Mario Penna (1987) "I "Signa Loquendi" Cisterciensi in un Codice della Bibliotheca National di Madrid" in (J Umiker-Seboek and TA Sebeok eds) Monastic sign languages. (Approaches to Semiotics; 76) New York: Mouton de Gruyter pp. 495-532
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Reposting from the Silent Heralds list, since I get far too excited over there.

The reason why the previous post was so important, was because every single reference you will find on this sign table leads back to Aungier. So, now we can have a better idea what other authors are referring to.

To give an example, two more well-known books that refer to Aungier are:

Lina Eckenstein, "Woman under monasticism: chapters on saint-lore and
convent life between A.D. 500 and A.D. 1500" (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1896)
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/History.EckenWoman
Has the chapter "The Foundation and Internal Arrangements of Sion"
http://snipurl.com/20n6k

Eileen Power "Medieval English nunneries, c. 1275 to 1535" 1922
http://www.archive.org/details/medievalenglishn00poweuoft
or http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23556422
p.287

The footnote that has me all excited though, is G.G. Coulton's "Life in the Middle Ages".
Although it's a snippet view on Google Books, it mentions that he's written about this previously in "Five Centuries of Religion," which was reprinted in the 1970s, is reasonably easy to find offline, and has volumes three and four online for free.

He also mentions Giraldus Cambrensis, who (if I'm remembering correctly) was the grumpy monk who thought the monastic signers were being too damn noisy. Through the power of the internet, it looks like there is more information about gesture in this JSTOR article. So I now have lots more exciting sources to chase up.

And this image seriously reminds me of somebody's SCA device. And I know he reads my journal.
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Books I can have access to...

Sous la règle de saint Benoît : structures monastiques et sociétés en France du Moyen Age à l'époque moderne : Abbaye bénédictine Sainte-Marie de Paris, 23-25 octobre 1980. La Trobe uni.

Monastic life at Cluny, 910-1157.La Trobe

'Anglo-Saxon Monastic Sign Language at Christ Church, Canterbury', Archaeologia Cantiana, 107, 1989 pp. 1-27. At the State Library

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