Aargh!

Dec. 7th, 2007 10:43 am
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm sorry, but this article is infuriating.

Albert Mudry and Léon Dodelé "History of the technological development of air conduction hearing aids" Journal of Laryngology & Otology (2000), 114: 418-423

Let's look at what this history says about pre-18th century hearing aids:

This method [ear trumpets] has been used from the beginning of time by hunters and warriors. It is quite probable that deaf people of ancient times and the middle ages must have thought of placing the mouthpiece of a horn or a bugle to their ear for purposes of ampliŽcation.5
Athanasius Kircher was the fiŽrst to write an essay on the hearing aid, and this was published in 1673. It is here that he described the famous Ellipsis otica, considered as the Žfirst acoustic prosthesis.6

The two references are to French texts that I can't read.
But, Kircher made a trumpet 16 feet long, embedded in his work room wall so he could talk to people outside.

The earlier reference by Bacon to 'ear-spectacles' in 1627 pre-dates Kircher, as does Magia Naturalis which is 16th century proper.

It is missing out on so much information, about air-conduction aids that it is really annoying. The majority of the information I have been able to find starts at the 18th century, and hardly any sources that talk about what medieval man may have been doing give references.

It's not all bad though. I've found some possible leads to follow up:
Leibniz's Project of a Public Exhibition of Scientific Inventions
A History of Inventions, Discoveries and Origins
The senses in late medieval England
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I just read about a fantastic-sounding book called LDK didikės proginėje literatūroje (The noblewomen in the Great Duchy of Lithuania at the end of 16th - beginning of 17th cent.)

The author is Jolita Sarcevičienė, and she has put the English summary of the book online. (Scroll down to "Santrauka anglų kalba")

She has also written previously about late medieval Lithuanian women and children. (click on the PDF icon.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The JAMA article I mentioned earlier doesn't seem to be easily available anywhere. (It doesn't help that the details in the bibliography are wrong.)

Found some more information on foxtails, there is a fool wearing one off his belt in chapter 65 of Sebastian Brant's Das Narrenschiff

There seems to be a bunch of motifs mixed in with fox tails, from being a sign of illness, and being an idiot (or even a jester) to being something sexy used to arouse women.
(Could this be the origin to ren faire wenches wearing tails?? Of course, I'm only guessing.)
It does seem that only very few of them were worn on the bum to simulate having a tail though. Mostly they appear on hats, or off to the side of belts.

However, there is at least one contemporary source that says women may have been wearing foxtails underneath their dresses.
John of Reading wrote that 'Women's bizarre clothing so so tight, that they wear the tails of foxes hanging under their skirts to hide their arses.' (emphasis mine.)

I should be writing an essay on botany however, so more researching may have to wait.

OMFG!

Aug. 18th, 2006 10:25 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Know what excites me more than a Baltic museum having part of their website in English?
Having lots of pretty colour photographs of both actual archaeological finds and their reconstructions.

Wheee! Behold LATVIAN SPRANG!

I'm not looking at their booklist, not at all. Nope.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Ah, pretties.

Sample from Archaeological Research in Estonia 1865-2005. Is more about the history of archaeology than archaeological finds, but still looks cool. (Click on Loe näidist for the PDF)

A very short review (scroll down) of Trapezoid Tombstones in Estonia -- I had never really noticed that these even existed before, but doing a quick google search reveals I must have read about them previously when researching early figural sculptures.

Mary tablet weaving?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
What Ancient Human Teeth Can Reveal? Demography, Health, Nutrition and Biological Relations in Luistari by Kati Salo is online for download.

Wordplay in Donald Duck comics and their Finnish translations by Maarit Koponen may be proof that Donald Duck is not banned in Finland.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
After the previous entry angst I'm writing up a quick article on Baltic children's clothes. Don't have much in the way of sources on it, (in that 99% of the sources reference back, eventually, to Anna Zarina), but it strikes me as an interesting article to write.
When (or if) it is done, it shall be online.

Is there anything people would like me to put online? I have a small collection of costuming stuff that I've researched and written....

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