Photos!

Jan. 7th, 2011 07:52 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Not by me, but by [livejournal.com profile] klan_land, via [livejournal.com profile] by_ethno .
Photos of textile tools from the History Museum of Latvia.

[livejournal.com profile] klan_land has also taken photos of some very brightly embroidered shoes from Minsk, and Polotsk but that's about as far as my Belarusian will stretch
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Photo of one of the shoes from Bergen, part of a webpage discussing a Norwegian radio programme.
http://www.nrk.no/programmer/radio/norgesglasset/1.4768626

And a link to an article from the 2009 Årbok for Bergen Museum about 12th century shoes.
"From Study Object to Shoes for People"
http://www.uib.no/bergenmuseum/nyheter/2010/04/fra-studieobjekt-til-sko-for-folk
Full article with more photos: http://www.uib.no/filearchive/bmaa09_hansen_-ta-paa-deg-sko_1.pdf
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Note: Note I've changed the comment settings. Until Livejournal pulls its' head in, come comment on Dreamwidth!

From the Ancient Egyptian Footwear Project, this is what I could find free, online, from the 14 or so articles that have been published so far:

Veldmeijer, A.J. 2009. Studies of ancient Egyptian footwear. Technological aspects. Part VII. Coiled sewn sandals. BMSAES 14; 85–96.

Veldmeijer, A.J. 2009. Studies of Ancient Egyptian Footwear. Technological Aspects. Part X. Leather Composite Sandals.PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology, 6(9); 1-27.

Veldmeijer, A.J. 2009. Studies of ancient Egyptian footwear. Technological aspects. Part XII. Fibre shoes. BMSAES 14; 97–129.

Veldmeijer, A.J. 2009. Studies of Ancient Egyptian Footwear. Technological Aspects. Part XV. Leather Curled-Toe Ankle Shoes. PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology 6(4): 1-21.

Veldmeijer, A.J. 2009. Studies of ancient Egyptian footwear. Technological aspects. Part XVI. Leather open shoes. BMSAES 11; 1-10.

And this is an article about rope and string. :)
pearl: (hanbok)
Eung-Tae Lee, was a Joseon male who died in the 1580s.

I've been going mad trying to find *any* information about shoes, and was finding vague references that he was buried with shoes. As I kept digging (and discovering an Antiquity article I need to wait a few more months to access) I found out some more stuff.

Namely, his shoes were sandals, and were part of a folk remedy at the time as they were woven from a mixture of hemp and his wifes' hair! She also wrote a letter to him, mourning his death (and it looks like it is written in hangul.)
http://bugo10.com/bbs/viewbody.html?code=board5&page=9&id=10032&number=10032&keyfield=&key=
http://www.withoutwax.org/Without_Wax/Blog/Entries/2008/11/14_16th_Century_Love_Letters.html


Edit: Beautiful, very high-quality looking photos of the letters and a shoe in Korea Magazine (8)5 2009 pp.35-39 (The linked page links to a very very large PDF file. 8.3Mb)
And a folding fan! Woo! (I read *somewhere* that folding fans were male-specific, but it is still cool.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Andrea Reichel "Die Kleider der Passion. Für eine Ikonographie des Kostüms" [The Clothing of the Passion: For an Iconography of the Costume] PhD Thesis.
http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/docviews/abstract.php?lang=ger&id=10145

And, there's this picture of a guy wearing lace-up boots,maybe? I found him while looking for Bundschuh ('tied shoes') which usually gets you pictures like these.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Feel free to share this link around. The pictures are gorgeous.
"The sixteenth century chic leather handbags/purses from Karmelava necropolis" at the Vytautas the Great War Museum.
http://www.muziejai.lt/kaunas/16a_odines_rankines.htm

and Restoration Programmes at Vilnius Lower Cawstle/Lietuvos Pilys
http://www.lvr.lt/site.php?contentID=27
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Every Step a Lotus: Shoes for Bound Feet By Dorothy Ko, has fabric shoes from 13th c. Manchuria, that weren't for bound feet.
Page 24 on Google Books
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Check out the knotted pendant sleeves of the scribe Oisbertus!
http://www.encyclopedie-universelle.com/abbaye-cisterciens2.html

Summa cartae caritatis (Chapter of Charity) might have some information about felt night shoes.

From Terryl N. Kinder "Cistercian Europe: Architecture of Contemplation" (Cambridge, UK: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. 2002) p. 61

As to shoes and stockings, the stockings were naturally of wool, and each monk possessed two pairs of shoes, one for day wear -- they might be considered work boots -- and one for night wear. According to the Summa cartae caritatis, "the day shoes shall be made of cowhide" -- that is to say, good, solid leather boots for hard manual labor -- whereas the night shoes were more like slippers of tick felt or felt-like material. There were more comfortable than the day shoes and certainly quieter, and they might also be worn in the infirmary. The provision of such day and
p.62
night shoes were fairly standard for all the contemplative Orders.

There you are, a reference for shoes. Niiiice.

Edit: Another reference...

Thomas Dudley Fosbroke British monachism; or, Manners and customs of the monks and nuns of England 1843
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=i9wDAAAAQAAJ

p.283
"Shoes occur in some orders, and slippers or socks made of felt, for day or night.' References Du Cange?

p.286
"Augustinian Eremite.... In the Specimen Monachologiae they wear... slippers..."

Here's the Specimen Monachologiae.

p.288
"Gilbertines.... two pairs of stockings; a pair of woollen socks, and day-shoes and night-slippers..."
Doesn't seem to have any references for that.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Late 16th/Early 17th counterpane
British Museum, Originally from Bengal.
AN38322001

The Impruneta Cushion; quilted and pieced, from before 1477.
http://www.chiantimusei.it/cgi-bin/en/pub_det_lun.cgi?id=35.

History of Medieval & Renaissance Quilting
http://www.historyofquilts.com/precolonial.html

Is This Stitch Period? Quilt Counterpoint
http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/quilting.html

At least one of the references in the above article is a bit wrong. The slipper is actually part of the Stein Loan collection at the Victoria & Albert museum.
Museum no: LOAN:STEIN.627 is the fan-shaped quilted shoe, but there is also the plainer
LOAN:STEIN.514 with just parallel stitches.
I'm pretty sure it's these shoes that are the inspiration for the slipper demo at Verte et Sable.

A Renaissance-inspired silk quilt
http://www.artisans-showcase.org/east/items/i_h_000065/index.html

Edit: The 61-page A Collection of Notes on the Historical Aspects of Quilting by Kateryn de Develyn
http://www.kateryndedevelyn.org/quilting.htm

And an off-topic pretty photo of Roman-era pewterware
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/research_projects/pewter_hoards.aspx
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The plaited-front style of shoe, is probably from just lacing thick cord like how you lace up a shoe. If the lacing is thick enough, and the seams are pulled tight together, you end up with a chevron pattern, just like a plait!

There are also some cool cutwork vamps that I need to take a closer look at...
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The shoe class went well, there are still bugs to iron out, but it was otherwise alright.
I spent the early evening drawing various basic shoe designs, so I can scan them in to make a version I'd feel comfortable putting on the web and using a creative commons license.

The decorative techniques that I hadn't figured out for shoe vamps started to make sense when I went to re-draw the pictures from Hald, it's deceptively simple but very effective looking.

Must also remember to get people to mark on their pattern if they've traced around their left or right foot, and ask them to write the opposite on the other side of the pattern. That way they can cut out one of each, instead of (say) two left feet.

Pre-cut cheap rectangles of craft felt only work for people who have feet womens' size 7 or smaller.

People really like the idea of pointy toes (and I forgot to mention a trick for that from a Polish shoe), but really aren't too keen on gathering/puckering. Nobody seemed game enough to try the 'pixie boot' pattern. Everyone secretly wants silly poulaines.

Now, I hope next time I run this class it doesn't end with me feeling quite so sore.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Hooray! The shoe class notes have been written and are being printed out.

When I re-draw the pictures, so I'm not breaking any copyright I'll put an online version up.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
There are some Viking-Medieval (vaguely dated) shoes from Novgorod that have a row of plaited leather down the front, which looks very similar to modern Polish Kierpce. It looks almost like the plait is made by threading in a strip of leather through slits on either side of the centre seam... somehow.

The Melbourne School of Fine Woodworking has classes on making bentwood boxes. Their website hasn't been updated in a while though.

As much as I love my little bamboo buckets for events such as Festival, the idea of having a bentwood box does hold great appeal.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Doing some last searching on the internet before I sit down and write the article of doom for the class on Saturday. One thing I found was medieval arch support.

The 7th century Sutton Hoo burial had 'an arch support made of hazel wood,' or at least that's what they think a piece of wood was doing inside the shoe.
There's a bit of information here. Scroll down to page 7. (The book referenced I can't easily get a hold of, so I'll have to trust the photographs from here.)


Can't find any other instances of arch support in shoes before 1600 though.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
There is a painting that shows a 'peasant shoe' of straw, like the traditional German strohschuh.

Meister der Karlsruher Passion, Kreuztragung Christi
1450

Colour version here, and large bildindex version here. See the guy in the lower right-hand corner? It does look like he's wearing shoes made from plant matter. I can see this being another way of making an overshoe to protect any nicer shoes. (It seems to be assumed though that the straw shoes are the only shoes you own. At least he's wearing hose between the straw and his bare feet.)

Did I mention that the man also has a really sexy-looking wooden bucket?

Edit: Trying to find a clear photo of the 'patten' worn by one of the statues of the Fontana Maggiore, Perugia hasn't yielded anything yet.
Edit, again: Some 12th century sculptures:
Madonna by Benedetto Antelami, Morgan Madonna from Auvergne, Virgin and Child from Morez, lots of 12th century-related pictures.

Some success:
Managed to find the stained glass windows from Elisabethkirche zu Marburg (before 1250). (Middle of the second row.)

There is the possible pattens being worn by the Apostle Bartholomew
Full pane: http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/fum_btr301.htm
Close-up: http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/ix_fum_r3.htm

I'd consider these to be pattens rather than sandals, because John the Baptist is in the pane next to him, and they took the time to paint his bare feet.
Full pane:http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/fum_btl301.htm
Close-up:http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/fum_bl305.htm

However, these are rather plain shoes, especially when comparing them to Marys' decorated shoes (from the second row, first on the left.)
Full pane: http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/ful_btl101.htm
Detail: http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/ful_bl105.htm

Or Elisabeth http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/ful_btl201.htm
and http://www.elisabethkirche-mr.de/rundgang/ful_bl204.htm

There is a bishop, also with decorated feet but he's 14th century.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I came home with peasant shoes today from one of the pawn shops near the train station. About a year ago they wanted $50 for them, and just at random I wandered in and they were still there, for $5.

Trying to figure out which sort of peasant shoe they are, it appears they're Macedonian, since the pictures on that website and the second photo on the right-hand-side of this site, and my pair match up pretty closely.

They're a _lot_ thicker than my one-piece shoes, and I'd assume that they would last longer than mine too. Maybe it's an 'only the rich can afford cheap shoes' situation, where the really thin, soft leathers might cost less in skills and time to make, but wouldn't last as long?

Did I mention how new these shoes were? They still had the string tying them together, and the shoe size written in pencil on the sole hadn't worn off!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Ohhhhhhh the programme for NESAT X is shiny! shiny shiny shiny! So much Baltic stuff! Due to be published 2009.

Arūnas Puškorius has written a lot about shoes*. I want to see if I can track down his doctoral dissertation. At least I found his e-mail address. Another article is "Kasinėjant 1986 metais Pajautos slėnį Kernavėje rastų odos dirbinių tyrimai" Archeologia Lituana, 2004

* Reprint of Puškorius A., Vedrickienė L., XVI – XVII amžiaus odinės avalynės radinių tyrimas ir restauravimas, Lietuvos dailės muziejaus metraštis, Nr. 3, Vilnius, 1999, p. 256–263.

Shoes are exciting for me right now, not really sure why. Probably because I'm trying to find examples of one-piece shoes from the 6-16th centuries so I can do an informative class or something.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Museum of London PDF press pack of the exhibition. (The front cover with the poulaines and modern shoes is worth it. Actually the entire file is really cool. Includes x-rays of medieval loaded dice, and photos medieval knitting. Mmmmm.)

A HTML article about the whip

For those who want to see more whips, I found an undated one from the Mittelalterliches Foltermuseum, Freiburg. (Medieval torture museum)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
This has been playing on my mind for ages. I knew that there was an embroidered item of clothing with runes on it, and that it was a shoe.

It is part of the Bryggen inscription corpus, item no B008, (link to a photo on that page).

I need to check if the shoe mentioned in Viking to Crusader was the same one, since I know that one had half of a well-known Latin phrase, and the guess was that the other shoe had the other half of the saying.

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