pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I finally got around to looking at the English translation of the 1583 ophthalmology text that has the weird "tied on" glasses that more general-history sources claim are spectacles.

Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Sweetness and Light wooden frames, purchased about two years ago, plus hallowe'en costume sunglasses equals this:

Green medieval-style riveted spectacles with green lenses.

Ooooh... ahhhhhh... preeeeetty, yes?

(Real coloured lenses in the middle ages don't seem to have been worn as sunglasses, but to correct poor eyesight. The tinting came from the using green-coloured beryl for the lenses. But I'd may as well be even more of an absent-minded fool than I already am and 'forget' that I'm still wearing my 'reading glasses' when outside and wearing silly clothes. I'm probably going to tie them on so I look even more of an idiot.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
4-6th c. Old Bering Sea culture ivory goggles, Alaska.
http://www.rom.on.ca/exhibits/ivory/role_imagegallery_3.php

6-11th c. Punuk culture ivory goggles, Alaska
http://www.donaldellisgallery.com/index.php/offerings/inuit_eskimo/snow_goggles/

7-11th c. Punuk culture ivory goggles, Alaska.
http://www.artnet.com/magazineus/news/artmarketwatch/artmarketwatch1-6-06_detail.asp?picnum=2
http://www.christies.com/LotFinder/lot_details.aspx?from=searchresults&intObjectID=4648452&sid=8d49407a-783c-4fe4-a9ad-f501231485af

13th century, ivory snow/sun glasses, from Arctic Canada (Thule culture)
http://www.canadacool.com/COOLFACTS/QUEBEC/Gatineau-OttawaSunglasses.html
http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Holman/english/life/environment.php3

14th century wooden snow goggles (Inuvialuit culture)
http://www.civilization.ca/media/docs/fsinuv02e.html

A written mention to 14th century, Thule culture goggles
http://www.gov.nu.ca/cley/home/english/summaries/04-09A%20friesen_edited_.pdf
More on the Iqauktuuq project:
http://www.kitikmeotheritage.ca/research/iqaluktk/intro.htm


Pre-1741 goggles
http://vilda.alaska.edu/u?/cdmg3,410
http://vilda.alaska.edu/u?/cdmg3,448
http://vilda.alaska.edu/u?/cdmg3,389
http://vilda.alaska.edu/u?/cdmg3,307

Snow Travel in Ancient Canada
http://www.civilization.ca/cmc/index_e.aspx?DetailID=6398#snowgoggles
(mentions snow goggles in Northern Europe?)

Undated and 18th century+ photos )

A nice school worksheet by NASA about the science behind snow goggles. :D
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/educ/docs/Snow_Goggles.pdf

Websites selling goggles:
Read more... )
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The Luneburg city museum website has photos of a dark tinted lens still in an eyeglass frame, found in the Michaeliskloster. 15th c
http://www.stadtarchaeologie-lueneburg.de/gal/gal35.htm
http://www.stadtarchaeologie-lueneburg.de/mag/mtl-brille.htm

It's also mentioned at the Antique spectacles website:
http://www.antiquespectacles.com/rivet_spectacles/actual/actual.htm


The problem is that, as a non-expert, a lot of the lenses may look cloudy or greenish, like this from Weinhausen, but I don't know if that's the original colouring, or if it's because corrosion or something else has happened. (More information on the Weinhausen spectacles here.)
There is also some artwork with green lenses, which dovetails with the beryll/emerald idea:
http://www.optiker.at/archiv/galerie/gries/gries.htm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Charles E. Letocha and John Dreyfus "Early Prints Depicting Eyeglasses" Arch Ophthalmol. 2002;120:1577-1580.
http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/120/11/1577
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
There seems to be a lot of indirect evidence for early lenses being made of beryl, which when green is emerald, but I haven't found any archaeological finds... yet.

Beryl
1303-05: Bernard de Gordon says that an eyedrop of his medicine was so effective, it meant people could read without an "oculo berillino" or "eye of beryl", probably a lens.

1363: Guy De Chauliac mentions in Inventarium Sive Chirurgia Magna "ocularios vitri aut berillorum" or "spectacles of glass or beryl".


Spectacles and Other Vision Aids makes the distinction between clear, quartz lenses, and 'sea green' beryl lenses, so it may be that all of these lenses had a coloured element to them?
Ren aissance Vision From Spectacle to Telescope on page 80 gives more references.

Tinted Glass
1380:Saint Paul is depicted wearing spectacles in an illuminated manuscript version of the popular French Bible Historiale.With a copy of an early 20th century re-drawing
Once again, a more trustworthy looking source, is Ren aissance Vision From Spectacle to Telescope p.66
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
An odd detail from a Luebeck altarpiece that might be sunglasses. Or, like squinting at the drawing of Johannes Ockeghem might be really wishful thinking.

My Google-fu is poor today, I'm having trouble finding detailed images of the panel with the supposed sunglasses.

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