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In:
R.M.A. Bedaux and R. Bolland Tellem. 1980. "Tellem, reconnaissance archéologique d'une culture de l'Ouest africain au Moyen-Age : les Textiles." Journal des africanistes 50(50-1); 9-23.
http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/jafr_0399-0346_1980_num_50_1_1992

It looks like it is the original French article, of which "Medieval Textiles from the Tellem Caves in Central Mali, West Africa" in the 1982 volume of Textile Museum Journal, which describes the coif as being dyed blue.
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Tutankhamun’s wardrobe

Tutankhamun Tuesdays Public Lecture Program
Tuesday 26 Jul 2011, 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Dr Gillian Bowen

Join Dr Gillian Bowen in an exploration of Ancient Egyptian attire.

The tomb of Tutankhamun has yielded the largest collection of clothes and footwear that we have from ancient Egypt. This talk will examine items of his wardrobe to show the range of clothes from underwear to formal attire and shoes, discuss the textile industry and range of materials used.

Dr Gillian Bowen is the Senior lecturer in Archaeology and Ancient History, Monash University. Gillian studies textiles and footwear from Monash's excavations in Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, and the textile industry on the basis of documents found there. She also conducts excavations in Dakhleh Oasis, with a focus upon early Christian sites.

Proudly supported by University of Melbourne, Programs Partner.

Please note the Tutankhamun exhibition is not open on Tuesday evenings.

http://museumvictoria.com.au/melbournemuseum/whatson/event/?event=563069
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Why is it that I seem to ask what should be simple questions, but it turns out people want to answer something tangential?

So, maybe this part of the internet might know, are there any other published examples where Viking Age garments have been sewn together with a contrasting-colour thread? (I'm not talking about 'ornamentation' like embroidery, or silk appliques or cords or braids. Just sewing the fabric pieces together. Or hemming.)

Because so far, it looks like there is some evidence from Jorvik and London, and that has been extrapolated to become a Viking world-wide fashion so everyone should have brightly sewn seams. Surely there's more than just that?

Quoting articles of varying quality. )
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From the Natural History Museum: Seeds of Trade online exhibition.

I like the maps. :)
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Photos from Professor Michael Fuller's collection, of fabric from Novgorod.
http://users.stlcc.edu/mfuller/NovgorodfabricP.html

Scroll down to the second photo, the one with the fabric with all the holes in it, and take a few steps back from your monitor.

See it?

I think I've noted the strange, holey fabrics before, but look at the pattern, it's part of a thundercross/swastika pattern!
I don't recall having this thought before, so I think this is a new idea for me, and I'm not just repeating myself.

Oh, and there is also a carved 12th century wooden bowl, that looks an awful lot like a pyrography project to consider. :)
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People who are fans of the Online Digital Archive of Documents on Weaving, might like the Complex Weavers Librarything account, where they have a lot of the books sorted according to tags.
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From Fibres and Textiles in Eastern Europe 5 - 6/2007
M. Cybulska, J. Maik "Archaeological Textiles – A Need for New Methods of Analysis and Reconstruction"
http://www.fibtex.lodz.pl/64_51_185.pdf

I'm sure there are more, but I'm technically taking notes during an oral presentation right now...

Edit: looked at 2008-2005
Some Aspects of Textile Drape
The Peculiarities of the Ornamentation of Lithuanian Traditional Woven Textiles
The Arrases of Wawel, the Polish Royal Castle in Krakow (16thc. Tapestry)
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From the reference mentioned in a Turnau article. Turnau mentioned a knitted Latvian shawl, which isn't mentioned in the English summary, but it might be in the Polish part. (Especially considering the article is focusing on Lithuania.)

Jaworski, Zygmunt (1949) "Welny tkanin ze sredniowiecznych kurkahow L.S.R.R."/"The wool of the Early Historical Tissues, found in the mount-tombs of Lithuanian S.S.R. Slavia Antiqua 486-507

p.506 [English summary]
"Woolen tissues with a linen ,,braid" were made and also tissues made by the system of four thread holders [ie. tablet weaving?]. Knitted goods were made with the aid of knitting needles of metal or wood. In these goods bronze beads about 6-7mm long and about 5mm in diameter were sometimes knitted in about every 20mm from each other, for decorative purposes. The remnants found in tombs prove that haberdashery ornaments were also made, very modest and simple however."
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Via [livejournal.com profile] frualeydis; Textile from Lazdininkai cemetary, 5-8th century Lithuania.
...

OK, my keyboard isn"t working very well for some reason. But go visit her journal and look at the pretty pictures with tablet weaving. Oh my!
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Check out the knotted pendant sleeves of the scribe Oisbertus!
http://www.encyclopedie-universelle.com/abbaye-cisterciens2.html

Summa cartae caritatis (Chapter of Charity) might have some information about felt night shoes.

From Terryl N. Kinder "Cistercian Europe: Architecture of Contemplation" (Cambridge, UK: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. 2002) p. 61

As to shoes and stockings, the stockings were naturally of wool, and each monk possessed two pairs of shoes, one for day wear -- they might be considered work boots -- and one for night wear. According to the Summa cartae caritatis, "the day shoes shall be made of cowhide" -- that is to say, good, solid leather boots for hard manual labor -- whereas the night shoes were more like slippers of tick felt or felt-like material. There were more comfortable than the day shoes and certainly quieter, and they might also be worn in the infirmary. The provision of such day and
p.62
night shoes were fairly standard for all the contemplative Orders.

There you are, a reference for shoes. Niiiice.

Edit: Another reference...

Thomas Dudley Fosbroke British monachism; or, Manners and customs of the monks and nuns of England 1843
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=i9wDAAAAQAAJ

p.283
"Shoes occur in some orders, and slippers or socks made of felt, for day or night.' References Du Cange?

p.286
"Augustinian Eremite.... In the Specimen Monachologiae they wear... slippers..."

Here's the Specimen Monachologiae.

p.288
"Gilbertines.... two pairs of stockings; a pair of woollen socks, and day-shoes and night-slippers..."
Doesn't seem to have any references for that.
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I'd never noticed this before, silly me.

All from the Fuller Museum of Virtual Archaeology: Medieval Novgorod Textiles

See the patterned fragment in the top right-hand corner?
It looks like some of the really elaborate swastika patterned embroidery from Prussia
Well, here it is up close. I could make that!

Also, [livejournal.com profile] celsa, there are some extant leather satchels here. Very generic dating of 10-15th centuries too. (Don't forget to right-click and view the image by itself, because the photos are huuuuuge and detailed.)

[livejournal.com profile] hometime, here is some stuff from Madrid. (The photos aren't as massive as the Novgorod ones, sadly.)
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Scientific Commons-- looks like it's a database of theses, articles, abstracts and publications that are available online for free. Has been pulling up some really interesting, although slightly random, things.

More on 16th century Czech dress

Articles just found that might be helpful for my garb class. )
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Henshall, Audrey S. "Early Textiles Found in Scotland. Pt. 1 - Locally Made." Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (86) 1951-2.

Is online! Hats! Shirts! Hoods! Naalbinded stuff! Lots more articles, papers, thesis' and more here!

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