Sorry!

May. 9th, 2012 09:44 am
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I am spending most of my time at the moment in places with no mobile phone reception, let alone internet access. I know I am missing large chunks of people's postings on Livejournal and Dreamwith (not apologising for Facebook, I'm never on top of that), so if there is anything people desperately want me to read, let me know in the comments!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I survived the Tasmanian Fungi Festival, and photographing some lichen in the snow!

Lichen! Photobucket
Coprinellus disseminatus (I think...), a saprophyte (wood-decaying fungus) in the forest.

(It's very difficult to photograph ice, I am quickly learning. I took a class on macro photography and the instructor was kind enough to help me out with my 4th hand, lacking-in-English-instruction-manual camera from Japan.) Met lots of lovely people in my backpacker's hostel, met interesting people at the fungal conservation and management symposium (and discovered it's a very small world), and now have a slightly better idea of what mushrooms and toadstools I am likely to run into in the field.

And I saw snow! Snoooooow!!
(If people want to see more photos, let me know, but they're either very Touristy, or close-ups of plants in the snow.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The thesis is in!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
What is the name of the statistical method, where you have a table of count data (for example, the presence of bugs at a site), and a bunch of different variables (like, say, soil types) and you want to see if the soil type is driving the bug-presence trend?

This has been driving me crazy, all I remember from statistics lectures is an example involving bugs and the phrase 'driving the trend.' Can't find it in my class notes either.


Edit: Panic over, [livejournal.com profile] ragnvaeig is a genius! 

Uni update:

Sep. 2nd, 2009 05:36 pm
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm apparently very good at my aseptic technique for fungi.
I now have fungi-babies* and some cuttings that may become plant-babies*, so I've been running about the lab preparing for (hopefully) some positive results and plant growth.

I'm extremely proud of the fungi, as I was terrified all last week that I was going to screw up horribly, and so far nothing too bad appears to have happened.

Next week: I'm going to play with emu faeces.

*These are, of course, the highly technical and scientific terms.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
The 'stay at home if you're sick' and basic hygeine/manners posters are out in force at uni.
Yes, even with the Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases headline.

(Of course, the idea now is to use disposable tissues that can be immediately thrown away instead of a hankie that sits in your pocket, but the basic principles haven't changed.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm trying to put together a presentation about my project, but the catch is that I'm presenting to non-botanists, and probably non-biologists for that matter. (I know the chemistry students don't understand most of the stuff I say!)

So, can some people help out with the poll below? I'm trying to figure out at what level my introduction to plant nutrition should start at.

Read more... )
pearl: (toadstool)
Hooray! My security card at uni worked!

(I had to resist the urge to open the door with the card, shut it, giggle, and open it again... it is that exciting!!!)

Oh, and really obscure journals (about mycorrhizal fungi, I swear!) are finally being delivered!

Everything always seems better after a Thursday and having long talks with the supervisor.

Uni...

Mar. 25th, 2009 01:37 pm
pearl: (toadstool)
today is going much better, because I have figured out that the mystery slide-thing is the Fåhraeus slide technique, named after this guy, and his article.

And found a recipe for smokewater. Double yay!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (pirate)
I suspect this is a pretty obvious question, but I have to ask:

So... Sandstone is coarser than siltstone is courser than shale, is courser than mudstone.

When they weather, they would break up into finer particles and wash away to be deposited somewhere else.

My question is, if that happens to sandstone, do you then get deposits of sand, and sand dunes building up, and is this distinct from, say, mudstone, where it would wash away and make something closer to soil? Or does it all make soil?

Please be gentle, I've been reading about regoliths, which is made out of *stuff* and sits on top of a layer of rocks. And I'm trying to figure out if you can have sand dunes on a regolith.
pearl: (toadstool)
B. Frank "Über die auf Wurzelsymbiose beruhende Ernährung gewisser Bäume durch unterirdische Pilze." Berichte der Deutchen Botanischen Gesellschaft, Band III, 128 - 145 (1885)
http://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/b-online/fo33/frank/frank.htm

Edit:
A.P. Kelley, Mycotrophy in plants; lectures on the biology of mycorrhizae and related structures (1950)
http://www.archive.org/details/mycotrophyinplan00kell

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