pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
"Hoods, Mittens & Collars: Icelandic Clothing from the 15th to the 18th century"
http://www.brown.edu/Facilities/Haffenreffer/IcelandicClothing.htm

Cool photos, largely of reconstructions. Can't find any photos of the originals online though, so it'll just have to do! :)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
See: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dolbex/5363274835/
And this blog post has a photograph of some of the information plaque that was alongside it.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From:
Chrystel R. Brandenburgh. 2010. Early medieval textile remains from settlements in the Netherlands. An evaluation of textile production Journal of Archaeology in the Low Countries 2-1
Online: http://dpc.uba.uva.nl/jalc/02/nr01/a02

Discusses pre-11th century textile finds from the Netherlands, including some fragments sewn with contrasting thread, hats sewn with decorative seam treatments, and some interesting Dublin cap-like-reconstructed headwear.

Edit: Click on the blue 'dynamic content' paperclip for an appendix of the technical textile details! Oooooh.

But, it also mentions this:

Mittens are present in two sites, Dorestad and Aalsum (figs. 21 & 22).22 In both cases coarse thick fabrics have been used, made of thin warp thick weft threads and woven with only a few threads per centimetre. The Dorestad mitten seems to have been primarily felted, which would have greatly enhanced its practicality. Both mittens were sewn very roughly with threads up to 2 mm in width.

Footnote 22 says, in part: The Aalsum mitten is dated between 700/900 AD. This date is based on associated finds.

There are colour photos, of the mittens too!
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
If you're the sort to be distracted by pretty pictures, for whatever reason the 2001 annual report from the power station company Landsvirkjun in Iceland, has decorated it with lots and lots of photos of historic Icelandic items, including on page 23 [PDF] a naalbinded mitten. (Or page 11 of the English version.)

This particular mitten was first discovered in 1889 and described in 1895. Margarethe Hald wrote an article about it. In Ancient Danish Textiles it was classed as Type IIa (aka Oslo stitch [PDF]). Everything I've read dates it to the landnám period, usually the 10th century.

There is much much more written about this mitten than the mitten from Akranes that was discovered in 1895. :(
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
My request arrived today, for:
Elsa E. Guðjónsson. 1994. "Barnavettlingar frá Heynesi" Gersemar og þarfaþing (Reykjavík: Þjóðminjasafn Íslands); 206-207.

There are only a few extra details that I didn't already know, so here they are in Icelandic and my (probably inaccurate) translation...

Under the cut... )

Still not the sort of (admittedly, strange) information I want, like mitten dimensions and how they were constructed, but confirmation that the cord is some sort of braiding is nice, too. :)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
My usually amazing ILL people have failed in being able to track down these articles, but if anyone else wants to have a go, they're welcome to. :) I'm putting it up here in case it is useful for someone.

After e-mailing Þjóðminjasafn Íslands /The National Museum of Iceland, to ask about the mittens from Heynes and Garðar, I received a lovely reply saying not much has been written about the adult mitten (except what I'd already mentioned in my e-mail*), but there was more information about the child's mittens:

Áslaug Sverrisdóttir. 2004. "Tóskapur, ullarvinna í bændasamfélaginu" Hlutavelta tímans (Reykjavík: Þjóðminjasafn Íslands); 194-203.
Elsa E. Guðjónsson. 1994. "Barnavettlingar frá Heynesi" Gersemar og þarfaþing (Reykjavík: Þjóðminjasafn Íslands); 206-207.
Elsa E. Guðjónsson. 1985. "Um prjón á Íslandi" Hugur og hönd. (Reykjavík: Rit Heimilisiðnaðarfélags Íslands 1985.); 8-12.
* Elsa E. Guðjónsson. 1962. Forn röggvarvefnaður Árbók Hins Íslenzka Fornleifafélags 59; 12-71.
* Pálmi Pálsson. 1895. Um myndir af gripum í forngripasafninu Árbók Hins Íslenzka Fornleifafélags 10; 30-35.

The most promising article looks to be "Barnavettlingar frá Heynesi" but darned if I can get my hands on a copy. :(
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm still talking about this pair of mittens, and figuring out the mysteries of string...

Read more... )

Edit: If you're a visual person, there is a quick photo here.

Aha!

Jun. 26th, 2010 07:55 am
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Apparently the cord that holds two mittens together is supposed to run through the coat-sleeves.
That makes a lot of sense!

(I was guessing a larks head knot through a buttonhole, and wondering how that wouldn't distort the buttonhole over time.)

Is this common knowledge for most people, that I missed because it really doesn't get cold enough here?
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Margrethe Hald. 1949-50 Vötturinn frá Arnheiðarstöðum, Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 50; 73-77.
http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2050611&issId=139971&lang=is
(It's about the naalbinded mitten, not the fabric one.)

and, about milk strainers made from hair...
Eldjárn, K. 1960. Að sauma síl og sía mjólk. Árbók hins Islenzka fornleifafelags 57; 48-63
(english summary p. 63)
http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2051562&issId=140005&lang=is
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
From:
Guðjónsson, E.E. 1962. "Forn röggvarvefnaður," Árbók hins Izlenska Fornleifafélags 59;12-71.
http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2051870&issId=140016⟨=is

(mitten photo: http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2051877&issId=140016⟨=is )
Under the cut )

Edit: Added more textile-y information here
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Miss Margarethe Lehmann Filhés sends a communication about Two Icelandic Mittens.

If anyone can help with a possible specialized textile term for aufzug, as in Der Handschuh ist aus gewebtem Stoff mit feinem Aufzug, doch sehr dickem Einschlag, gefertigt, I'd love to know, it sounds like 'fabric with fine ribbing' to me... so a textured twill?

And I keep on finding typos, sorry.
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
I'm attracted to the stranger medieval things. Like fabric mittens instead of knitted, naalbinded or leather ones. So, I'm trying to find any information about this other than a brief mention in Halds' Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials in the naalbinding section, pg.304.

I also want to make the gloves from Moshchevaya Balka, but I want more information on that too. Ah, what is an insane costumer to do?

And, hopefully try some more complex naalbinding stitches, with the Kekomäki stockings (or mittens... nobody seems to know the position of the grave find, and the stocking idea is based on ethnology. Satu Hovi says that from talking to archaeologists that it's a mitten since it was found at the waist, see the section on the Kaukola mitten.)
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
For the sake of my sanity, I'm not looking at naalbinded hand-wear right now.
This is mostly for Eastern Europe, and what else I randomly found so it won't have everything.

If anyone is wondering, the first glove on the list looks really interesting and tempting to try and make.

Gloves

Gloves from Moshchevaya Balka
http://www.hermitage.ru/html_En/02/hm2_3_0_7_4.html
Gloves of Roger II, (Sicily?)
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_06.htm
Archbishop Rodrigo Ximereze de Radas' gloves, 13th c.
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_43.htm
Knitted glove from 15th century Riga, Latvia
http://latviasfriend.blogspot.com/2007/06/can-you-buy-yarn-in-riga.html
15-16th century knitted silk glove
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_79.htm
16th century glove, of Bishop Nicolaus Shimer
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_42.htm
16th century fabric(?) glove of Queen Elizabeth
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_77.htm
Glove of Lord Fairfax, 17th c.
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_49.htm

Mittens

Mitten from Staraya Ladoga
http://snipr.com/1sims
Mitten from Moshchevaya Balka
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v244/quokkaqueen/mittens.jpg (from
http://pearl.livejournal.com/177848.html)
Knitted mitten from Jõuga, Estonia, 13th c.
http://hem.bredband.net/annlyf/13thC-knit-fragment.pdf
Velvet mittens I know I've seen before:
http://www.kostym.cz/Anglicky/2_Detaily/01_Doplnky/II_01_02.htm

The Kongshirden website has a lot of mittens and gloves too.

Fabric shoes for people who want an alternative to leather.

Cool pattens
pearl: Black and white outline of a toadstool with paint splatters. (Default)
Riga lays claim to having the first Christmas tree! Although people are skeptical, and everything leads back to the Patricia tourism office, but it's still interesting.

I've linked to Latvias Friend before, but there's still more stuff about mittens to keep one occupied.

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